Humans share unusual signs of brain tumors including odd behavior and loss of smell

Shaun Turner, 38, was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2014 after his personality changes.  (Brain Tumor Research/SWNS)

Shaun Turner, 38, was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2014 after his personality changes. (Brain Tumor Research/SWNS)

A man who suddenly becomes “passionate and aggressive”, later discovers that personality changes are a sign of a brain tumor.

Shaun Turner, 38, of East Cowes, Isle of Wight found an orange-sized mass in his brain in 2014 after he also lost his sense of smell and his eyesight deteriorated.

“I’m usually very chill and relaxed with a lot of energy,” the father of two said of the sudden personality change. “But the effects of the tumor made me very tired all the time and very excited and aggressive.”

Shaun said hearing his diagnosis “didn’t feel real”.

“My family and friends were so worried about it that I felt like I couldn’t show any weakness or that it bothered me,” she explains. “I had a positive attitude and really believed I was going to be OK, but I was scared inside.”

Read more: Dad dumped his exhaustion on the old Covid but instead a brain tumor that grew over 10 yearsYahoo Life UK, read 4 min

At the same time, he was gradually losing his sight, so his wife ordered him to have an eye test, during which an anomaly was revealed.

After a scan, Shaun is found to have an orange-sized mass in his brain. He underwent surgery to remove the tumor in October 2014, but says there are still small traces of cancer in his brain so he is now being monitored during routine scans and undergoing radiotherapy in December 2020.

Shaun pictured with his brother Daniel and mother Jill who died of glioblastoma - a fast growing and aggressive brain tumor.  (Brain Tumor Research/SWNS)

Shaun pictured with his brother Daniel and mother Jill who died of glioblastoma – a fast growing and aggressive brain tumor. (Brain Tumor Research/SWNS)

Sadly, the family faced cancer again, when they lost Shaun’s mother, Jill Turner, to glioblastoma – a fast-growing and aggressive brain tumor, in December 2018.

“The disease that has hit our family twice is shocking,” explains Shaun’s brother, Daniel, 36, an electrician. “We have asked the doctors the possibility of passing it on to our children, but they say it is pure bad luck. My brother has had genetic tests done and nothing has proven that it is in your family genes.”

Read more: Mother living with cancer found out she had a brain tumor after forgetting why she was shoppingYahoo Life UK, read 4 min

Shaun's brother Daniel recently went on a charity cycle to raise money for Brain Tumor Research.  (Brain Tumor Research/SWNS)

Shaun’s brother Daniel recently went on a charity cycle to raise money for Brain Tumor Research. (Brain Tumor Research/SWNS)

Daniel was among a team of nine cyclists who covered the 68-mile Isle of Wight Randonnée on Saturday July 1 to raise money for the charity Brain Tumor Research.

Dozens of cyclists completing routes around the island raised more than £10,000 for charity.

Dr Karen Noble, director of research, policy and innovation at Brain Tumor Research, said: “Brain tumors do not discriminate; they can affect anyone at any age.

“Having two diagnoses in the same family is a very rare occurrence, less than one in a million chance.

“If we want to change the stark facts about surviving this disease, then we have to invest more in what science is discovering – the path to a cure.”

Read more: The woman who had a seizure due to stress was shocked to find that she had a 6 cm brain tumorYahoo Life UK, read 4 min

Brain tumor personality changes

In the UK, more than 12,000 people each year are diagnosed with a brain tumor.

Common signs and symptoms of a brain tumor include headache, eye and vision related problems (such as squinting and double vision), persistent nausea, vomiting and extreme or sudden sleepiness.

But according to the NHS, mental or behavioral changes, such as memory problems or personality changes can also be signs of a potential brain tumor.

Brain Tumor Research says brain tumor personality changes can sometimes occur in people who have already been diagnosed, with one in three people the charity spoke to admitting to having experienced personality changes caused by the brain tumor or its treatment.

These changes can range from a lack of motivation to irritability and even aggression.

However, it should be noted that not everyone who has a brain tumor will experience personality changes.

Read more: New mom’s ‘torturous migraine’ turns out to be a fast-growing brain tumorYahoo Life UK, read 5 min

The charity says brain tumor behavior and personality changes can include:

  • irritability or aggression

  • confused and forgot

  • apathy (lack of interest and motivation)

  • depression and emotional leveling

  • losing inhibitions or restraints and behaving in a way that is socially or culturally unacceptable

  • worry

  • mood swings or extreme moods

  • difficulty planning and organizing

  • difficulty identifying emotions in yourself and others.

Managing personality change will depend on what caused it, according to the Brain Tumor Research.

If swelling around the brain is causing the changes, steroids may be prescribed to help reduce the effects of the swelling. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may be used to help when changes in personality or behavior are caused by a tumor affecting the pituitary gland.

The charity also recommends seeking professional support if personality changes are affecting you or your relationship.

Where to go for help

Contact Brain Tumor Research Support and Information Services

0808 800 0004 Free from landlines and cell phones

support@thebraintumourcharity.org

The telephone line is open Monday-Friday, 09:00-17:00

#Humans #share #unusual #signs #brain #tumors #including #odd #behavior #loss #smell

Leave a Comment